CCS is pleased to share the news, views, and tools you may have missed this past week!   

  1. Tax reform first steps could happen this week. The Council on Foundations issued an email to its members on Wednesday morning stating that House Republicans plan to release a tax reform framework document by the end of this week. The NonProfit Times outlines what this could mean for citizens – and non-profits – in the coming months. 
  2. Studies suggest that wealthy and non-wealthy donors are motivated by different messaging. Recent studies by psychologists Ashley Whillans, Eugene Caruso, and Elizabeth Dunn suggest that wealthy donors are more responsive to requests that appeal to their sense of independence and self-reliance, while less wealthy donors are more likely to respond to requests that emphasize social connection and community. Scientific American explains how these studies were conducted and why emphasizing individual impact could be the key to engaging high net worth donors.
  3. Non-profit experts share advice on remaining politically neutral. For most non-profit organizations, staying out of partisan politics is critical but becoming increasingly difficult. This week, the Chronicle of Philanthropy shared tips on how to build consensus around your mission without being branded “conservative” or “liberal.”
  4. Retool your grateful patient program! On August 15, CCS Managing Director Ted Blackburn and CCS Executive Director Hannah Yaritz will be joined by Centura Health Mountain North Operating Group Chief Development Officer Shelley Thompson to take an in-depth look into grateful patient fundraising. Register for our next complimentary webinar, Accelerating Your Grateful Patient Fundraising Program.
  5. Congratulations to Marin General Hospital Foundation! Marin General Hospital Foundation recently announced the public launch of Building Better Health: The Campaign for Marin General Hospital after raising $64.2 million in the quiet phase. Read the press release about this extraordinary effort that CCS has had the pleasure to help plan and manage.

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